BLANCHOT GAZE OF ORPHEUS PDF

Britain's first book blogger Nov " Perhaps the best resource in English on European modernist literature " — Irish Times Now a major motion picture. Please do not think this is anything other than an interested question, but do you write prose or poetry or work in any other art forms? Jason, I can't help but think of it as more than an interested question! But, yes, I do write in an other form not poetry.

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The split in the Orpheic world is predetermined: there is light and there is darkness; life above and death below. And yet, he continues,. Orpheus has gone down to Eurydice: for him Eurydice is the limit of what art can attain; concealed behind a name and covered by a veil, she is the profoundly dark point towards which art, desire, death, and the night all seem to lead.

She is the instant in which the essence of the night approaches as the Other night. Rendering this dark point, the lure, the point in which the artist's control is undermined, is also the object of the work of art:. Orpheus' work does not consist of securing the approach of this "point" by descending into the depth.

His work is to bring it back into the daylight and in the daylight give it form, figure and reality. Orpheus can do anything except look this "point" in the face, look at the center of the night in the night. The superimposed triangles depicted by Lacan in his article on the gaze figure the path undertaken by Orpheus, as well as the evasion, at each end, of the object of artistic desire:.

Rather than obtained, the object of desire is always displaced. Drawn from darkness to light, its absence or invisibility is re-articulated as a gap, a notion of loss, a signifier, within the frame of language, within a poem of lament. Whether looking back into the darkness or blindly entering light, Orpheus never sees his Eurydice outside her daily mask or beyond appearance, never, that is, sees her in accordance with his impulse which.

Ordinary, social life merely fragments and stifles the desire to assimilate with, or possess the other's otherness as such; it attempts to decode that which is sought after as incomprehensible, to grasp or control that which is desired as undefined.

The turning away from light and from language is desire's "only way [to] approach [its object]: this is the meaning if concealment revealed in the night" Ibid. Both directions, down into the darkness and back into the light, are determined by desire. Yet, concealment is exposed at each end.

It is depth that the subject desires, a perception of itself through the gaze's depth of field. But "Depth [ the three dimensional world which as such embodies Orpheus' descent] does not surrender itself [to a] face to face" surface encounter. It does not yield to the eye's perception in the dark, or to the mind's construction in the light. On the other, it is reduced to a geometrical point: a subject, a Cartesian consciousness trapped within its own bounds.

Between these two modes, between perception and consciousness, says Lacan, the encounter with the real is forever missed: Eurydice slips back into the night. The Eye - my point of vision - is absent from the world's view of it the Gaze ; within the image constructed by the Gaze, I am reduced to a mere object, articulated in terms foreign to my own. Similarly, the gaze at me, from within my own view point, can never be grasped in terms transcending my own perspective, can never be deciphered - seen - from without: a night within the night.

The world of the other the underworld dissolves differences. In the visible, upper world, on the other hand, the artistic effort to reconstruct a form, to bring Eurydice unveiled into the light, operates, still in the service of desire, in a direction counter to assimilation unification ; a direction which reestablishes difference, absence and split through a mask, through language.

Through one point of absence bottom line control is undermined; through the other top line it is established. Within the one end the eye the subject, Orpheus is lured and annihilated; through the other a lure is constructed, a disguise. In both instances evasiveness defines and is defined by the notion of desire, the desire of the other's desire of the self: the frustrated path from a lost self to the lost other, and back to a once again this time deliberately lost, masked, self; a yearning for the "essentially missed encounter", an impossible appropriation of otherness as such.

The Four Fundamental Concepts, Mimicry, like art, says Lacan, is not concerned with harmonizing with a background.

Rather, by veiling his eye, by assuming a shape other that his own, the artist Orpheus affects difference in order to accommodate the eye to the gaze, in order to control "that which defines [the self] in the light".

In other words, mimesis reestablishes the lack marked by the object of desire, hence forming a new level of deception or lure; an imitation of the lure of the night in the night. This time, however, it is a lure designed for the spectator:.

In the picture, says Lacan, you look at me from the place from which I see you. By "situating [itself] in the picture as a stain", by inscribing [itself] in it as absence", the artist's eye i. No longer is it merely absent from a picture imposed upon it, it is also absent from a picture it constructs as a lure for another's eye.

He is only Orpheus in his song, he could have no relationship with Eurydice except within the hymn". And yet,. He loses Eurydice because he desires her beyond the measured limits of his song, and he loses himself too, but this desire, and Eurydice lost, and Orpheus scattered are necessary to the song. The Gaze of Orpheus, Only thus can its control be asserted. Mimesis - an abandoning or a separation of the self from itself - is effective as a lure for the spectator's gaze, only by concealing the split by its product - a mask.

One can act attain a goal only by stepping into the light, into language; and it is there that appearance -- the self as other, as sign -- is forced into being.

This is the realm of the Gaze, and the only place where interaction through signifiers and code can occur. This is the function of discourse, of song, of text. The reconstructed lure, through mimesis, effects a shift from one dependence Orpheus' dependence upon Eurydice to another his audience's, the mimetic reader, dependence upon him, the poet :.

The Four Fundamental concepts, p. It is the spectator who is now willingly absorbed, through the artist's veiled eye, within the latter's gaze. Yet it is only through an agreement between them that this lure -- the lure of the mimetic text -- can be effective. In order that both artist and spectator be effaced, as signifiers, within the work of art, a set of rules guiding their selective inattention to their own context and to the stain as a mark of the author's controlling hand must be established: the stain is a sign the spectator must ignore for deception fiction to operate.

This is the central field, where the separating power of the eye is exercised to the maximum in vision" Ibid. It is the means by which the eye, while concealing itself, also signifies itself as absent. Thus it maintains its position as lack within the gaze it constructs, and undermines the threat of its unmarked absence within an image rendered by mere perception.

Yet for the lure to be effective, a set of rules must be formulated in order to suspend detection of this mark, in order to conceal the sign of the hand behind the artifact. These rules must govern the interaction, through the text, between author and reader. The mimetic text urges the reader to submit herself to a world without fractures, a world of mimicry, of concealed differences; where the "I" forms an integral part of the multi-angles of the gaze, a position it is granted through the spectator's "willing suspension of disbelief".

The split, the mark of the author's absence, the mark of the artifact, must be concealed within that which it breeds - the mimetic text. And yet, he continues, Orpheus has gone down to Eurydice: for him Eurydice is the limit of what art can attain; concealed behind a name and covered by a veil, she is the profoundly dark point towards which art, desire, death, and the night all seem to lead.

Whether looking back into the darkness or blindly entering light, Orpheus never sees his Eurydice outside her daily mask or beyond appearance, never, that is, sees her in accordance with his impulse which [ The Eye and the Gaze Lacan The Eye - my point of vision - is absent from the world's view of it the Gaze ; within the image constructed by the Gaze, I am reduced to a mere object, articulated in terms foreign to my own.

Mimesis Mimicry, like art, says Lacan, is not concerned with harmonizing with a background. This time, however, it is a lure designed for the spectator: figure 2 In the picture, says Lacan, you look at me from the place from which I see you. And yet, [ The reconstructed lure, through mimesis, effects a shift from one dependence Orpheus' dependence upon Eurydice to another his audience's, the mimetic reader, dependence upon him, the poet : [The Artist] invites the person to whom this picture is presented, to lay down his gaze there as one lays down one's weapons.

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The Gaze of Orpheus

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Gaze of Orpheus, The

The split in the Orpheic world is predetermined: there is light and there is darkness; life above and death below. And yet, he continues,. Orpheus has gone down to Eurydice: for him Eurydice is the limit of what art can attain; concealed behind a name and covered by a veil, she is the profoundly dark point towards which art, desire, death, and the night all seem to lead. She is the instant in which the essence of the night approaches as the Other night. Rendering this dark point, the lure, the point in which the artist's control is undermined, is also the object of the work of art:. Orpheus' work does not consist of securing the approach of this "point" by descending into the depth.

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The Gaze of Orpheus and Other Literary Essays

The Gaze of Orpheus has since been evaluated by many a philosopher and literary critic. Blanchot's interpretation or use of the Gaze of Orpheus is in artistic creation. Rendering this dark point, the lure, the point in which the artist's control is undermined, is also the object of the work of art. Blanchot uses the myth to transcribe the creative process.

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The Gaze. Although the ambiguity and disjunctive style of the novel promotes a multiplicity of reads, Thomas the Obscure essentially mirrors the classical myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. In keeping with this, Thomas, after the initial joy of his reunion with Anne, begins to escort her back to the world. However, like Orpheus, who, according to myth, turned around and looked at Eurydice before she had passed into the world, Thomas, without concern for possible repercussions, casts a backward gaze at Anne.

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