LESION DE BANKART Y HILL SACHS PDF

The labrum of the shoulder joint can be torn as a consequence of a forceful shoulder dislocation. When the damage only involves the labrum it is called a Bankart lesion. A Hill-Sachs lesion occurs when the lesion to the labrum presents simultaneously with a structural defect of the bone of the humeral head. A Bankart lesion consists of a tear of the glenoid labrum. When the humeral head pops out of the joint during a forceful, mostly anterior, shoulder dislocation, it may tear the capsule surrounding the shoulder joint and cause the detachment of the labrum from the glenoid.

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Background: Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions are commonly associated with anterior shoulder dislocations. The presence of Bankart lesion indicates the need for surgical repair. Magnetic resonance imaging MRI has been shown to be sensitive in detecting these two lesions. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions on MRI for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations.

Methods: Between and , 61 patients from Alfred and Sandringham Hospitals had an MRI as part of the investigation for traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. The MRI scans were reviewed and subsequently confirmed by a radiologist to show the presence or absence of Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions. The data were then analysed by a statistician. Results: Although patients with one of these lesions were more than two-and-a-half times as likely to have the other, small study numbers precluded this result from achieving statistical significance.

Younger age was a strong predictor of a recurrence of shoulder dislocation odds ratio, 0. Conclusion: There is a strong correlation between both lesions. This apparent trend can be useful in predicting the presence of a Bankart lesion when a Hill-Sachs lesion is identified on a plain radiograph. This study suggests the consideration of surgical repair after identification of a Hill-Sachs lesion on plain radiographs, especially for younger patients where the rate of re-dislocation is high.

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Full-text links Cite Favorites. Abstract Background: Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions are commonly associated with anterior shoulder dislocations. Similar articles Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: a report of 49 cases with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Zhu YM, et al. Am J Sports Med. Epub Apr PMID: The relationship between Hill-Sachs lesion and recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation.

Cetik O, et al. Acta Orthop Belg. Assessment of coincidence and defect sizes in Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions after anterior shoulder dislocation: a radiological study. Horst K, et al.

Br J Radiol. Review of the literature]. Heller KD, et al. PMID: Review. Anterior dislocation of the shoulder associated with Bankart lesion in a patient with Poland's syndrome: a case report and review of the literature. Zwolak P, et al. Int J Sports Med. Epub Dec Show more similar articles See all similar articles. Cited by 19 articles Is quality of YouTube content on Bankart lesion and its surgical treatment adequate? Akpolat AO, et al. J Orthop Surg Res. Management of primary anterior shoulder dislocations: a narrative review.

Hasebroock AW, et al. Sports Med Open. Ranalletta M, et al. Arthrosc Tech. Tang J, et al. Arthroscopic remplissage: Is it still an option? Morsy MG. Show more "Cited by" articles See all "Cited by" articles. MeSH terms Adolescent Actions. Adult Actions. Aged Actions. Humans Actions. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Actions. Middle Aged Actions. Recurrence Actions. Retrospective Studies Actions.

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Correlation Between Bankart and Hill-Sachs Lesions in Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

A linear bony fragment chipped fracture related to the inferior aspect of the glenoid process raises the possibility of a bony Bankart lesion, otherwise everything else seems to be in order. The CT confirms the X-ray finding of a chipped fracture of the inferior aspect of the glenoid process, however a wedge shaped defect can also be seen at the posterior aspect of the humeral head, that was not evident on the plain radiograph suggesting Hill-Sachs lesion with bony Bankart. Another defect noted at the posterior aspect of the humeral head. Hill-Sachs fracture and Bankart lesion are common sequelae to recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder joint. Hill-Sachs lesion is a compression fracture of the posterolateral humeral head due to its compression against the anteroinferior part of the glenoid when the humerus is anteriorly dislocated. A Bankart lesion results from a detachment of the anterior inferior labrum from the underlying glenoid due to the same mechanism.

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Hill–Sachs lesion

Hill-Sachs lesions are a posterolateral humeral head compression fracture, typically secondary to recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations , as the humeral head comes to rest against the anteroinferior part of the glenoid. It is often associated with a Bankart lesion of the glenoid. The concept of engaging. Bankart lesions are up to 11 times more common in patients with a Hill-Sachs lesion, with increasing incidence with increasing size 8. Hill-Sachs lesions may be difficult to appreciate on x-rays, frequently requiring CT or MRI for full characterization.

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Hill-Sachs Lesion: What Is It and How Is It Treated?

Background: Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions are commonly associated with anterior shoulder dislocations. The presence of Bankart lesion indicates the need for surgical repair. Magnetic resonance imaging MRI has been shown to be sensitive in detecting these two lesions. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between Bankart lesions and Hill-Sachs lesions on MRI for patients with traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations. Methods: Between and , 61 patients from Alfred and Sandringham Hospitals had an MRI as part of the investigation for traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations.

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