HOW TO BE AN ARTIST MICHAEL ATAVAR PDF

Creativity is an important driver of entrepreneurship and innovation, and is increasingly being recognised as something that can be analysed, researched, taught and practised. The author is an artist and consultant who blends creativity with business, art and psychology see more resources here. Here are my key takeaways and tips for entrepreneurs, artists and innovators from this compact page book. Develop a practice of just looking and listening — at cars, mobile phones, and even sunsets.

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Creativity is an important driver of entrepreneurship and innovation, and is increasingly being recognised as something that can be analysed, researched, taught and practised. The author is an artist and consultant who blends creativity with business, art and psychology see more resources here.

Here are my key takeaways and tips for entrepreneurs, artists and innovators from this compact page book. Develop a practice of just looking and listening — at cars, mobile phones, and even sunsets.

Describe what you see, in detail. Encourage self-reflection and your own creative instincts. Even in the digital age, pencils and drawings help the creative process.

Recording opens the door to tuning in. Keep a visual log, and try to find connecting narratives. Creativity responds to rigour and discipline. A regular space should be used for the creative experience — this can be a room, desk or even a notebook. Creativity is as much a process and attitude as a product. You should be able to step out of this space and back in regularly.

This can also be expressed through painting, sketching, and even random dance steps. It is also important to get feedback from others. Expose your work to others. There is also a component of fun, play and even messiness in the creative process. Start building things on the floor.

Lying on the floor changes your worldview. Look at your past notepads and diaries as well; creativity is a method for investigating the self. Interview yourself and ask about your motto, philosophy, colours, numbers, and secrets, advises Michael. What would happen if you called yourself a director or film maker? However, ideas are only the starting step: execution is as important. Images are powerful triggers for creativity, particularly for visual learners.

Drawing helps engage with ideas and shape them, via form, colour and charts. See if you can draw dirt, mirrors, waves, gold dust, catapults and chocolate boxes. Does a rose reflect the beauty and thorniness of your current situation? Metaphors along with drawing encourage new pathways. Photographs can provide the spark for a project. Other ways to unlock oneself from the present include standing under a waterfall, climbing a mountain to get a new view, travelling back in time, and even unlocking a barely used room.

See things in a different way. Live your day backwards - even down to the meals, Michael jokes. Give an idea a title, such as The Horizontal, or Process A. Switch places and roles. In the organisational setting, ask for regular suggestions and conduct think-tank sessions often.

Use a creative object to get into the creative mood. Redecorate or shuffle the office. Pay attention to the ambience, not just the central focus. There will be risk in such activities, of course — for example, via harsh criticism. It is therefore important to place emphasis on simplicity and instinct. There will always be shadows, mists, phantoms and even mistakes along the creative journey, but all of them are instructive.

Keep moving, and have a conversation with yourself as you move through a series of possible futures that include failure steps. Other perspectives and viewpoints help in interpreting success or failure. Listen to yourself. Take a no-computer day, advises Michael. Use this as a daily compass. Describe your emotional state using colours and metaphors. Ask for what you want.

Even in the digital age, it helps to do physical things. Let your work sit for a while. Set mini-projects, for example, for one hour period. Some of these will need to be abandoned along the way. Colours and shifts of colouring schemes also jiggle the creative muscle.

Use colour to bypass static thinking, and invoke the child-like impulses of different colouring materials, advises Michael. Despite these techniques, blocks can continue to emerge. Talk to your creative blocks, have a dialogue with them, and remove the lines between you and your blocks. Draw the blocks, take them to the supermarket, ask how them how they feel, jokes Michael. Alternate between the visible and invisible, between excitement and boredom.

Random elements and stimuli jolt you into new creative states of mind. Add unpredictability to your work; work with chaos. Create phrases from random words.

Throw the dice. Accidental poetry can help here, and even turning things backwards or upside down. Much has been written about bio-mimicry and its impact on innovation, such as velcro. Draw nature and its variability — in cloud, vapour, light, and even dirt and empty space.

The journey of looking and losing, of gaining and returning, is essential to creativity. Try doing things differently — such as use your left hand if you are a right-hander. Try a blindfold, crutches, or wheelchair to understand difference. Pick random words from the Bible, guidebook or thesaurus to trigger new thoughts.

Slow down your turntable, advises Michael. Instead of being the lead, be the assistant. Work with different groups, and write down what creative elements are missing in you. Tap informal networks. Flashback to what interested you earlier. You may end up stumbling upon the solution from a backward glance, an accidental slip-up, a mismatch, or a surprising source.

Choose a random book, TV channel, radio station, or old magazine to depart familiar territory. To wrap up, some of the material in the book is repetitive and puzzling; more rigour, references and case studies would have helped, but the book is an intriguing guide to creative behaviours. You must devote enough time, resources, and space to your creative capacity building. Want to make your startup journey smooth? Learn from India's top investors and entrepreneurs.

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How To Be An Artist

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Openness, randomness and acceptance of failure: 12 steps to creativity, by Michael Atavar

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How to be an Artist

If you want to tap into that unexplored part of yourself that gets bulldozed by work, commitments, lack of space, then this is the book for you. I believe that you can grow your artist in a nurturing and supportive way, giving it the time and resources to develop and blossom. This is a book that takes the inner artist seriously — the playful, the complicated, the difficult part — leading it on a journey that includes starting, building a practice and planning long term goals. If you are an experienced practitioner, there is also much to discover in this book about getting in touch again with the key ideals that drew you to creativity in the first place. Simple methods for overcoming the fear of beginning.

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