EL ASCO HORACIO CASTELLANOS MOYA PDF

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

Author:Kishicage Fegal
Country:Kazakhstan
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Personal Growth
Published (Last):22 September 2009
Pages:432
PDF File Size:18.49 Mb
ePub File Size:15.10 Mb
ISBN:629-4-74959-498-5
Downloads:78571
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Dozilkree



Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read.

Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — El asco by Horacio Castellanos Moya.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published October first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about El asco , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters.

Sort order. Translated this. James Wood included it on his list of four favorites for Translated this. James Wood included it on his list of four favorites for View all 19 comments. Horacio Castellanos Moya wrote "Revulsion" as an exercise in style. He imitated Thomas Bernhard's cadence and repetition to demolish El Salvador, just as Bernhard used to demolish Salzburg and Austrian society. But El Salvador is not Austria. A funny, clever and entertaining short novel the scene in the brothel is pure black humor filled with the violence and horror from Salvadoran society.

Humor is still one of the best - if not the best - way to deal with the horror and absurdities of life. It's a pity some people simply lack any sense of humor. But, as Walser said, "You can't confront your own country with impunity. But, please, do avoid it if you don't have a sense of humor or if you don't enjoy Bernhard's style.

View all 9 comments. Aug 13, M. Lee allowed me the opportunity to read this work before he found a publisher for it. I am so glad he did. An incessant rant by a character named Edgardo Vega directed to, I suppose, anybody who might be listening, but in this case even more pointedly at the character Moya himself as receptor. It is also the author Moya who is relating this tale, though the words come all from the mouth of Vega.

Early on I was a bit distracted by the obvious attempt at a Bernhardian rant, but I continued on with my reading in the spirit of some of my own vitriol and those of others I have known who have let it all out and used me as their sounding board.

Thomas Bernhard certainly wasn't the first person to ever behave this way in person, but perhaps he was the first we serious readers had noticed doing so on the page. I continued on with my reading of Revulsion because I have known several inflicted people like this who would not have a clue who Bernhard is and would most likely care less if they did. These people for the most part do not read and are not interested in anything but the made-for-TV film version to make its way on to their cable network.

In the end, what is important to me is what the rant is dealing with, from which the complaint derives it substance from, and if the rant can sustain itself and keep me interested. Obviously, this rant did or I would not be writing about it. I have a mentor who is extremely judgmental, said to be tyrannical even, and refuses to read translations of any stripe.

The irony in his rigid stance here is that he says to all he teaches to that he loves the work of Gilles Deleuze and Thomas Bernhard, just to name two, and both of these writers are not of the same English-speaking ilk that he is.

The work of both of these writers has been translated, one from the French and the other from the German, and I know for a fact my famous friend knows no other language than his own. So when I express to him my delight in finding new authors, new for me anyway and an exercise he seems to encourage and respect, new foreign writers for me such as Moya, or Walser, Sebald or Zweig, translated authors who flat knock me out, my mentor is not interested and refuses to even take a look at them.

Or if I were to inform him that a certain someone such as Moya has written an amazing book such as Senselessness that brings to mind the rantings of a lunatic not heard of since Bernhard made his mark on him he would say, without a doubt in my mind, that these types of rantings on the page are best left to the Bernhard master of them all and for others to do something unforgettable on their own of merit and to quit copying what others have done before them.

The problem for me with this statement is that the fiction of my own good friend is often compared to Bernhard and whose words are constantly reminded of the great Austrian especially in his sometimes uniquely personal and intensely crazy rantings of his own. The way I look at all this discussion above of who did what and if it is meritorious or not comes down to simply whether or not it has its own voice and if the subject is interesting.

When I read Thomas Bernhard I hear his voice, and what he speaks of is instructive and tantalizing. When Max Sebald reveals his disdain for something or other I hear his particular voice and find his arguments and complaints quite captivating as well.

And to be fair I will even mention myself and the character of Ponzil in Shorter Prose I published only recently. What I do not understand however is why this novel Revulsion has not been published in our English language yet. I have read the reasoning and explanation provided by Lee Klein who has transcribed his well-worded English translation of Moya's book and has so far not found a publisher to make it available to readers of our own language.

It is striking to me to note that Bernhard was beloved by his own country, and many prizes were bestowed on him which Bernhard also used against them. Perhaps the greatest difference between the writers mentioned above and the writer Moya is that in this particular story there wasn't anything mentioned of worth beholden to his country. Not only did Vega hate the people, he hated the geography and the weather. It is possible there is far too much truth in Vega's words, and Moya's countrymen simply do not appreciate it.

But why the great powers of North America care about putting a bad light on El Salvador is beyond me. It isn't something I am accustomed my own country, in general, caring two hoots about. All of us, at times, might have a moment for expressing our rants.

But the onus is on the ranter to make our tirades interesting and well-written if they are to be actually published in a book. The voice must be our own. But come on here, ranting is ranting. Crazy talk is crazy talk. I confess that voicing my own hatred and vitriol at times feels rather good and freeing, and is something I also like to read of others doing in order to assuage or rid myself of my own personal misanthropic feelings for my fellow countrymen and certain obstacles in my path in realizing my innermost desires.

Just because Thomas Bernhard has performed his rantings on the page in the most gifted of literary form is not a good enough reason for other writers to not speak their own mind or express what their bodies are provoking in these quivering and twitching mannerisms incessantly invading them.

It is a breath of fresh air for me, though I am positive there are examples of this style that are purely unacceptable, and I am also sure there is enough poor work I would absolutely detest and scorn if given the opportunity to read it. But not this one. This book was good.

Especially Edgardo Vega relating to us his ride on the crowded plane to San Salvador and the disgusting fellow passengers spreading their own sweaty filth on our unfortunate and terminally unhappy narrator. Thank you Lee Klein. View all 13 comments. May 27, Nathan "N. I never could accept that of the hundreds of countries where I might have been born I was born in the worst country of all, the stupidest, the most criminal, which is why I went to Montreal, well before the war began, not in search of better economic conditions, but because I never accepted the macabre twist of fate of being born here.

View all 3 comments. An encounter with an enraged art professor in San Salvador, repulsed at his homeland, its inhabitants, its lack of culture, its homes containing members of his family, leads to an hilarious score-settling rant, culminating in a piece of slapstick featuring the timid professor trapped in a hellish night out at a sleazy bar, and even sleazier broth Mr. An encounter with an enraged art professor in San Salvador, repulsed at his homeland, its inhabitants, its lack of culture, its homes containing members of his family, leads to an hilarious score-settling rant, culminating in a piece of slapstick featuring the timid professor trapped in a hellish night out at a sleazy bar, and even sleazier brothel, crazed in search of the Canadian passport that allows him free pass from his hellish homeland.

A satisfyingly brutal read. View 2 comments. Only certain A. I think of that as a sad compliment. It is also interesting to think that although "Thomas Bernhard" is such a miserable and disagreeable character, he occasionally has some useful cultural critiques. I guess to a degree it's in how you choose to see the world. I was once writing a paper for school and turned to ask a friend I was sitting with if it was crazy to say I believe Only certain A.

I was once writing a paper for school and turned to ask a friend I was sitting with if it was crazy to say I believe that humans are inherently good; to which, my friend replied that well, it was the complete opposite of everything he believes, which, I get where he is coming from, but he is also a pretty big activist for animal rights and saving their habitats, which I think is a pretty good thing.

View 1 comment. Now I understand that with Revulsion what I did was try to rid myself of that style that was infecting me. The novel is narrated by Moya, essentially the author.

CARLOS CASTANEDA INVATATURILE LUI DON JUAN PDF

Horacio Castellanos Moya

Horacio Castellanos Moya born is a Salvadoran novelist, short story writer, and journalist. Castellanos Moya was born in in Tegucigalpa , Honduras to a Honduran mother and a Salvadoran father. His family moved to El Salvador when he was four years old. He lived there until when he left to attend York University in Toronto. On a visit home, he witnessed a demonstration of unarmed students and workers in which twenty-one people were killed by government snipers.

EC2352 COMPUTER NETWORKS QUESTION BANK PDF

El asco: Thomas Bernhard en San Salvador

We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days When will my order arrive? Leonardo Padura Fuentes. Haruki Murakami. Jose Emilio Pacheco.

FULGOR Y MUERTE DE JOAQUIN MURIETA PDF

.

AVIDEMUX 2.5 TUTORIAL PDF

.

Related Articles