ANDERSONVILLE KANTOR PDF

Andersonville is a novel by MacKinlay Kantor concerning the Confederate prisoner of war camp, Andersonville prison , during the American Civil War — The novel was originally published in , and won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction the following year. The novel interweaves the stories of real and fictional characters. It is told from many points of view, including that of Henry Wirz , the camp commandant, who was later executed. It also features William Collins, a Union soldier and one of the leaders of the "Raiders".

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On the seventh day of May, , according to that small certificate in its gold frame, the trustees of Columbia University greeted all persons and made it known that MacKinlay Kantor had been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Letters — Fiction. I knew my grandfather well. I was a snotty adolescent, predisposed to think skeptically of members of all previous generations, especially those who happened to be in my family.

But all of that was ancient history to me, barely visible through the fog of the past. The one thing that had always impressed me, and impressed anyone who heard of it even after his name and the names of his books had been mostly forgotten, was there, inside that frame — a document appearing to be nothing more than a bit of bureaucratic inconsequence, a preprinted form with spaces for a name and a title, which were typed in as if an afterthought.

As someone who aspired to be a writer — a desire I had always attributed to a seventh-grade poetry assignment or a charismatic college professor — I had often considered what it would be like to win recognition on such a grand scale.

I could imagine the almost drug-like rush upon hearing the news; the ratification for all the world to see that your best efforts were, in fact, good enough. In fact, the very first document I saw — sitting atop the first file in the first box I opened — turned out to be the germ from which Andersonville had sprung. It was a letter Mack had written to my grandmother, Irene Layne, on April 24, , from a German town just five miles outside the just-liberated Buchenwald concentration camp.

In a later interview I found, he said that in Buchenwald he had been shocked by the horror of what men were capable of doing to other men in the name of war, and the recognition that the insanity was not restricted to Nazis in Germany. Then I knew I was going to write it.

He then spent 18 months completing it — a massive novel of more than , words. Of course the book is so good that frankly it seems to me that I must not have written it.

It somehow captivates everyone who reads it. Everyone has to go back to War and Peace for comparison. In September, after Mack had labored through the galleys, all pages of them, he and Irene went off to Europe to recover. How we both live for things like this — and how rarely they happen.

We have the rare knack of enjoying and milking every last drop of excitement. For that is what you are today. The accolades poured in with the money.

I found a revealing note on this subject from Targ to Carlos Baker, a renowned literary critic and Princeton professor who later wrote the best-known biography of Ernest Hemingway. Indeed it would. A letter my grandfather wrote on May 4, , took me along for the ride.

He described a chance encounter with an old friend. Mike Cowles had hired Mack as a columnist at the Des Moines Register a quarter century earlier, and had since gone on to found Look magazine. Now, by coincidence, they were staying at the same hotel. He had no such dope, and with great effort refrained from leaping for joy. I never count on anything until official announcement is made. As Mack and Irene and Cowles and his wife sat together in the bar, Cowles must have sketched out the jury report while my grandfather floated along on a high unrelated to the top-shelf whiskey in their glasses.

Germain Blvd. Is that a way to celebrate a unanimous Pulitzer Prize? He spent years writing another massive historical novel, Spirit Lake , attempting to do for the Indian Wars what Andersonville had done for the Civil War.

The patience for thousand-page books written in florid language with archaic dialect had all but expired. Spirit Lake met with mixed reviews and disappointing sales. Mack kept writing as he had always done, but his health and spirit never recovered and the work of his final years only diminished his fading reputation.

He died in My grandmother moved to modest quarters and lived five more years, leaving little for their children to inherit but a handful of paintings, a huge cache of books and that framed declaration of literary success. And I can look at it anytime I want. When my mom died in , the Pulitzer certificate came to me, as I was the writer in the family.

I hung it on a wall in my house but have only truly come to appreciate it after these many months of steeping myself in his life. I discovered my grandfather was flawed in ways I had never suspected, yet far more admirable than I could have imagined.

Born into poverty with an emotionally abusive father, his elemental drive and love of words had propelled him, at least briefly, to one of the highest pinnacles a writing man could attain. A graduate In it still seemed possible to think that gun laws in the United States might be tightened. Editorial writers across the country regularly took up the cause, including Richard Aregood of the Philadelphia Daily News.

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From the Pulitzer files. MacKinlay Kantor receives the Medal of Freedom. In Buchenwald he had been shocked by the horror of what men were capable of doing to other men in the name of war, and the recognition that the insanity was not restricted to Nazis in Germany. Shroder's new book about his grandfather. About the Author.

Tom Shroder. Related Stories From the Pulitzer files. More Pulitzer Stories.

BIRSA MUNDA MOVEMENT PDF

Grandson remembers 'Andersonville' author Kantor

On the seventh day of May, , according to that small certificate in its gold frame, the trustees of Columbia University greeted all persons and made it known that MacKinlay Kantor had been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Letters — Fiction. I knew my grandfather well. I was a snotty adolescent, predisposed to think skeptically of members of all previous generations, especially those who happened to be in my family. But all of that was ancient history to me, barely visible through the fog of the past. The one thing that had always impressed me, and impressed anyone who heard of it even after his name and the names of his books had been mostly forgotten, was there, inside that frame — a document appearing to be nothing more than a bit of bureaucratic inconsequence, a preprinted form with spaces for a name and a title, which were typed in as if an afterthought. As someone who aspired to be a writer — a desire I had always attributed to a seventh-grade poetry assignment or a charismatic college professor — I had often considered what it would be like to win recognition on such a grand scale.

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The man who wrote 'Andersonville'

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